Your Ultimate Boating Resource

What Wind Speed Makes The Sea Rough?

When it comes to the sea, the wind speed is one of the most important factors in determining how rough the waters will be. The higher the wind speed, the rougher the sea will be. But what wind speed makes the sea rough?

In general, winds of 10 knots (11.5 mph) or more can make for a rough sea. This is because winds of this speed can create waves that are between 1 and 2 meters (3-6 feet) high. These waves can cause choppy waters and make it difficult to navigate a boat or swim in them.

Winds of 20 knots (23 mph) or more can create waves that are 3 meters (10 feet) high or more, making for a very rough sea. These conditions can be dangerous for boats and swimmers alike, as they can easily capsize or be swept away by strong currents.

It’s important to note that other factors such as tides and currents can also affect how rough the sea is. For example, if there is an incoming tide while there are strong winds, this could cause larger waves than normal and make for a rougher sea than usual.

Winds of 10 knots (11.5 mph) or more can make for a rough sea with waves between 1 and 2 meters (3-6 feet) high. Winds of 20 knots (23 mph) or more can create waves that are 3 meters (10 feet) high or more, making for a very rough sea that is dangerous for boats and swimmers alike. Other factors such as tides and currents should also be taken into account when determining how rough the sea will be.

Have something to add or correct? Please let us know by clicking here.
* See disclaimer in the footer of the site for use of this content.

Related Questions

 

Latest Posts

Don't Miss

Our Newsletter

Get the latest boating tips, fishing resources and featured products in your email from BoatingWorld.com!