Larson Senza Spectre

Posted: May 1, 1990

25 feet of raw sport machine

By: BoatingWorld Staff

Sweeping curves. Euro-style ports. Louvers. Pinstriping. Spoiler aft deck treatment. Larson Boats' new Senza Spectre has styling that screams â here comes the next centuty.⠝ The 25 foot, two inch Spectre is the lates in Larson's Senza series for 1990. The five other models include the 210 LX Cuddy, 210 LX Bowrider, 190 LX Bowrider, 170 LX Bowrider and 165 Bowrider. The smallest Senza is outboard powered; the larger three have stern drives. While all six models boast aggressive, sporty design, the Sectre creates the most dramatic impression. Its profile gives it an image of speed even at a standstill, with a sweeping molded cockpit cowling that rakes upward besind a low-profile wind screen, topped with a wrap-around stainless steel rail. From the windscreen aft, the lines flow smoothly back downward. Completing the high-velocity effect, the gunwale flows aft, dropping tword the stern to meet the chine at the twin molded swim platforms, just behind the transom. The platforms are notched at the center, on either side of the stern drive. Grabrails for swimmers and water skiers are so cleverly incorporated into the design, they seem almost like chrome trim. At the dock or on the water, the Senza Spectre turns heads. Our test boat was a brilliant electric teal color with white cockpit interior, trimmed with teal striping and cockpit carpeting. For other tastes, flaming red and solid blue color schemes are also available, along with an all-white version with black bottom and contrasting red interior. All exteriors feature wild hull grapics that shout â Senza,⠝ for all the worl to see. If all of this is a bit racy, consider that speed is the name of the Senza game. The cockpit, for example, is executed in true offshore design. The VDO in strument cluster is arranged in a simple, easy to read display, behind the adjustable tilt, sports car-style steering wheel. Single lover controls are immediately at hand to starboard, below a padded coaming. Helmsmen can sit or stand, leaning against a wrap-around sea bolster for maximum security underway. An identical arrangement is provided for the passenger, to port. Foot rests are builtin, against the cabin bulkhead. Aft, a U-shaped lounge with seating for three adults curves around the cockpit, following the swept-back cockpit coaming. A ski tow ring is mounted just aft of the cockpit, and is easily reached from within. The molded engine cover/aft deck features a pair of racing-style padded headrests for the cockpit, as much for style as for fuction. Forward, against the companion seat back, a small cockpit refreshment center features a sink and beverage holders. The boat is equipped with an AM/FM cassette stereo system, of course. Rounding out the Spectre's comforts is a lockable cuddy cabin, under the foredeck. A V-berth fills the forepeak, forward of a crawl-through bulkhead, with room for an optional marine head. Small bench seats line the side of the entry area. While the Spectre is not really built to be a family cruiser, it offers enough room for both afternoon naps and informal overnighting. As a functional capsule, the Spectre's cuddy cabin is a well-engeneered package. Good engineering also is evident in its performance. A Rocket Ride The easiest way to describe the Senza Spectre's hull lines is to call them â rocket-shaped.⠝ Unlike conventional deep-Vs, the Senza rides on Genmar's patented Duo Delta-Conic hull â “a modified-V with complex surfaces to reduce wetted drag and improve stability, at speed and at rest. In the Spectre's case, a step is added to increase lift and speed For power, our test boat was equipped with a 7.4 liter, 330 hp Volvo Penta Duo Prop stern drive. The base boat comes equipped with a smaller 5.7 liter, 260 hp MerCruiser. Other options include a sizzling MerCruiser 454 Magnum stern drive and through-hub, through-transom or Silent Choice performance exhaust systems. Whatever the options selected, performance will be impressive. Away from the dock, our test boat performd like a champ. At idle speed, the engine was quiet, belying its power. Upon acceleration, the twin-screws bit instantly, popping the hull into plane without hesitation. There was almost no stern dig, thanks to the unusual hull design and Duo Prop traction. At high speed, the rack-and-pinion steering was light, yet not overly sensitive. Although the boat was stern-drive trim sensitive, as you might expect it to be, it was lso exceptionally sure-footed and highly maneuverable. Running full throttle at 62 knots, the slipstream whistled neatly up and over our heads, even without a formal windshield. The absence of glass and the flat black dashboard eliminated visual distractions, making it easier to spot objects in the water. The stylish Senza Spectre is every bit a contemporary sportboat, built to be run and admired. But this is by no means Larson's first success in the world of â flash and dazzle⠝ speed machines. A half century ago, Larson Boats' founder, Paul Larson, was bowling over buyers with his futuristic, rocket shaped wooden runabout, the Falls Flyer. That illustrates the fact that some good boating ideas never really leave us.
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